Copyright

Keeping It Simple: My Workflow

A few weeks ago a few of my followers asked what my workflow is. The short answer: Import via Lightroom or PhotoMechanic, pull into Photoshop, save as new file. I’ll keep my discussion with LightRoom as most people don’t use PhotoMechanic. But the main difference between the two programs is that after ingesting the images in PM, you must export to external editing software for the most part.

As I don’t have a need to upload a million photos, I’m pretty critical of what I do upload. With this in mind, I may go out for a 5, 6, or 7 hour shoot and only upload 2 or 3 photos. Quality over quantity.

File Structure for My Raw Images:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photogray

Read more of How I Keep My Workflow Simple

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Photos of the Year: My Favorites from the past 12 months.

2014 turned out to be a good year for me. Not only have I shot more Getty Images assignments, more newspaper assignments, but I’ve also had the privilege to photograph many sporting and news events, a wedding, and a few portraits.

On top of that, I also went out of my way to practice more landscape photography shooting at night, using ND filters to get 4 minute exposures in daylight, and getting out of my comfort zone hiking into remote places.

These are my favorites from the year. There are more on my site in the gallery 2014 Year in Photos – My Favorites from the Year to view more exciting images from the year 2014.

Get Outta My Way:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Mount Baker running back Johnny Mata (23), right, evades an open field tackle by Montesano linebacker Logan Truax (5) during the first quarter of the 1A State Playoffs at Civic Field in Bellingham, Wash., on Friday evening November 14, 2014.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Mount Baker running back Johnny Mata (23), right, evades an open field tackle by Montesano linebacker Logan Truax (5) during the first quarter of the 1A State Playoffs at Civic Field in Bellingham, Wash., on Friday evening November 14, 2014.

Incoming Storm:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Long exposures of incoming storm over Squalicum Harbor in Bellingham, Wash., on Tuesday October 28, 2014.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – Long exposures of incoming storm over Squalicum Harbor in Bellingham, Wash., on Tuesday October 28, 2014.

Don’t Get It In Yer Eyes!!

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Natalie and Codey's wedding and reception at the Edgewood Inn in Woodland Park, Colo., on Saturday afternoon Dec. 13, 2014.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – The flower girls getting prepped for Natalie and Codey’s wedding and reception at the Edgewood Inn in Woodland Park, Colo., on Saturday afternoon Dec. 13, 2014.

 

That Low Sinking Feeling:

© Paul Conrad/ Pablo Conrad Photography - Bellingham High School senior Christian Amano of Bellingham, Wash,. lands in the pit during his attempt at the long jump druing the NWC Track & Field competition at Civic Field in Bellingham. Amano ended 8th overall with a distance of 18 feet, 11 inches.

© Paul Conrad/ Pablo Conrad Photography – Bellingham High School senior Christian Amano of Bellingham, Wash,. lands in the pit during his attempt at the long jump during the NWC Track & Field competition at Civic Field in Bellingham. Amano ended 8th overall with 18 feet, 11 inches.

Squalicum Harbor at Sunset:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Sunset at Locust Beach and Squalicum Harbor in Bellingham, Wash., on Tuesday evening July 15, 2014.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – Sunset at Locust Beach and Squalicum Harbor in Bellingham, Wash., on Tuesday evening July 15, 2014.

Mt. Baker & Refinery:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Mount Baker is illuminated by the setting Sun as the lights at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes, Wash., turn begin to illuminate the petroleum plant.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – Mount Baker is illuminated by the setting Sun as the lights at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes, Wash., turn begin to illuminate the petroleum plant.

Rain? What Rain?:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Valerie Snelling of Bellingham takes in the surroundings during the Fairhaven Steampunk Festival at Fairhaven Village Green in Fairhaven, Wash., on Saturday afternoon July 19, 2014. Snelling says this was her first time dressing in Steampunk fashion and began working on her costume at midnight. Hundreds enjoyed the sights of individuals dressed in Steampunk Victorian costumes, live entertainment, food and vendors .

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Valerie Snelling of Bellingham takes in the surroundings during the Fairhaven Steampunk Festival at Fairhaven Village Green in Fairhaven, Wash., on Saturday afternoon July 19, 2014. Snelling says this was her first time dressing in Steampunk fashion and began working on her costume at midnight. Hundreds enjoyed the sights of individuals dressed in Steampunk Victorian costumes, live entertainment, food and vendors .

Keeping His Eye on the Ball:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Lynden wide receiver Scooter Hastings (88) concentrates to catch a touchdown pass as Hockinson defensive back Quentin Sills (20) attempts to interrupt the play early the second quarter in the Class 2A State Playoffs at Civic Field in Bellingham, Wash., on Saturday afternoon November 22, 2014. Hastings touchdown and resulting extra point a 21 to 7 lead over Hockinson. Lynden defeated Hopkinson 52 to 28 to advance to the semi-final.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Lynden wide receiver Scooter Hastings (88) concentrates to catch a touchdown pass as Hockinson defensive back Quentin Sills (20) attempts to interrupt the play early the second quarter in the Class 2A State Playoffs at Civic Field in Bellingham, Wash., on Saturday afternoon November 22, 2014. Hastings touchdown and resulting extra point a 21 to 7 lead over Hockinson. Lynden defeated Hopkinson 52 to 28 to advance to the semi-final.

Faceplant:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Hannah Scarth of Arlington, Wash., dives head first into the Holee Kow mud pit during the 3rd annual Mud to Suds race on Saturday morning August 16, 2014, at Hovander Park in Ferndale, Wash. Nearly 2000 people ran the 2.5 mile course negotiating 22 obstacles including mud-filled pits, hay bales, and a soap foam tunnel. The event raised funds for the Girls Scouts of Western Washington.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Hannah Scarth of Arlington, Wash., dives head first into the Holee Kow mud pit during the 3rd annual Mud to Suds race on Saturday morning August 16, 2014, at Hovander Park in Ferndale, Wash. Nearly 2000 people ran the 2.5 mile course negotiating 22 obstacles including mud-filled pits, hay bales, and a soap foam tunnel. The event raised funds for the Girls Scouts of Western Washington.

Teaching Art:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Senior instructor Amy Hill of Bellingham, Wash., demonstrates a brush stroke technique while teaching a class at Uptown Art painting studio on Bellwether Way in Bellingham, on Friday evening December 5, 2014.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Senior instructor Amy Hill of Bellingham, Wash., demonstrates a brush stroke technique while teaching a class at Uptown Art painting studio on Bellwether Way in Bellingham, on Friday evening December 5, 2014.

Out of the Trap:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - John Milkotic drives from a sand trap at the 9th green during the final day of the 40th Bellingham Amateur Golf Tournament at Lake Padden Golf Course on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, in Bellingham, Wash.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – John Milkotic drives from a sand trap at the 9th green during the final day of the 40th Bellingham Amateur Golf Tournament at Lake Padden Golf Course on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, in Bellingham, Wash.

A Head Above

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Whatcom Community College freshman forward Canyon Silliman (18) goes above Shoreline Community College jufreshman defensiveman Ryan Anderson (12) during the first half on Orca Field at Whatcom Community College in Bellingham, Wash., on Saturday afternoon Oct. 4, 2014. The visiting Shoreline Dolphins defeated the WCC Orcas 1 to 0 by a last minute second half goal.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Whatcom Community College freshman forward Canyon Silliman (18) goes above Shoreline Community College freshman defensive man Ryan Anderson (12) during the first half on Orca Field at Whatcom Community College in Bellingham, Wash., on Saturday afternoon Oct. 4, 2014. The visiting Shoreline Dolphins defeated the WCC Orcas 1 to 0 by a last-minute second half goal.

Piping:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Bellingham Pipe Band member Gary Griffiths practices in the men's locker room during commencement services for graduating Western Washington University students in Carver Gymnasium at Western Washington University on Saturday morning June 14, 2014, in Bellingham, Wash.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Bellingham Pipe Band member Gary Griffiths practices in the men’s locker room during commencement services for graduating Western Washington University students in Carver Gymnasium at Western Washington University on Saturday morning June 14, 2014, in Bellingham, Wash.

Vampire’s Delight:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - The partial solar eclipse and the cross at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Walnut Street in Bellingham, Wash., on Thursday afternoon Oct. 10, 2014.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – The partial solar eclipse and the cross at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Walnut Street in Bellingham, Wash., on Thursday afternoon Oct. 10, 2014.

Getting Energized:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Ian Murray of Canmore, Alberta, hydrates prior to the start of the mountain biking leg of the 2014 Ski to Sea Race on Sunday, May 25, 2014 in Ferndale, Wash.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Ian Murray of Canmore, Alberta, hydrates prior to the start of the mountain biking leg of the 2014 Ski to Sea Race on Sunday, May 25, 2014 in Ferndale, Wash.

The year 2015 is looking to be another fantastic year. I hope to continue my personal projects as well as take on more assignments and clients.

I am now booking for the upcoming wedding season, family and senior portraits. Send me an email at paulconradphotography@gmail.com or check out my wedding and portrait information pages.

Thank you for stopping by to read and view my work. Feel free to comment, critique, or just ask questions.

Also, feel free to share and reblog, link to, and add your site in the comment section.

Paul “pablo” Conrad

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Paul Conrad is an award-winning, nationally and internationally published freelance photographer living in Bellingham, Whatcom County, Wash., north of Seattle in the Pacific Northwest. His work has been published in newspapers and magazine throughout the United States and in Europe.

His clients include Getty Images, Wire Image, The Bellingham Herald, and many local business in Whatcom County. Previous clients are Associated Press, the New York Times, L.A. Times, Denver Post, Rocky Mountain News, and many others.

His specialty is photojournalism covering news, sports, and editorial portraits, he also is skilled in family portraiture, high school senior portraits, and weddings. He is available for assignments anywhere in the Pacific Northwest.

Ups & Downs of News Photography: Covering an Assignment for the San Antonio Express-News

A few weeks ago, a friend of mine, Andy Bronson of the Bellingham Herald, referred me to Photo editor Luis Ruiz of the San Antonio Express-News for an assignment.

The assignment was to cover the official release of the U.S. Chemical Safety Board report which states the cause of an explosion that killed 7 people in the early morning hours of April 2, 2010, at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes. The refinery is about 45 miles southwest of Bellingham. San Antonio is home of the Tesoro Petroleum.

Refinery Lights across the Bay from Seafarer’s Memorial Park

© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - Public hearing and official release of the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report on Thursday evening Jan. 30, 2014, at Anacortes High School in Anacortes, Wash.. The report concerns the safety failures at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes which exploded and killed 7 people on April 2, 2010.

One glitch in an otherwise routine news assignment, San Antonio is two hours ahead and the meeting at the High School begins at 6. The newspaper’s deadline is at 9 Central. So the meeting starts an hour before their deadline. Wonderful.

Refinery Lights Reflecting in Fidalgo Bay
© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - The Tesoro refinery as seen from Seafarers Memorial Park across Fidalgo Bay on Thursday evening Jan. 30, 2014. A public hearing was held with the official release of the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report on the safety failures at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes which exploded and killed 7 people during the early morning hours of April 2, 2010.

I’ve worked on deadline before. However, it is usually at my newspaper so there is some leeway if you just call and let the editors know you’ll be 10 or 15 minutes late. But this was a big assignment for a rather large respectable metro newspaper. Looks like I’m going to work my ass off to get the images in.

The assignment was pretty simple. Other than the early deadline, the next day I was to spend with Vicki shooting images around Anacortes of people’s reactions and shots of the refinery. But as editorial assignments can sometimes go, that changed.

Chemical Safety Board Begins the Presentation:

© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - Chemical Safety Board lead investigator Dan Tillema during the public hearing and official release of the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report on Thursday evening Jan. 30, 2014, at Anacortes High School in Anacortes, Wash.. The report concerns the catastrophic failure of a heat exchanger at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes which exploded and killed 7 people on April 2, 2010.

Which is fine as that’s not anything new to me. You have one of two choices: either bitch and whine about it, or just accept the new limits and finish the job. Water off a duck’s back. Roll with the punches. Improvise, adapt, overcome.
You must be flexible when working with newspapers. It is demanding at times, but that’s one of the reasons I like it so much. And you get to see some cool stuff on someone elses dime.

In this case, instead of going around town seeking local reaction, the business page editors just wanted shots of the refinery. No big deal, except fresh in my memory is a few disturbing reports of photographers being arrested while taking photographs of refineries. Here’s a link to a New York Times Lens Blog concerning photographers being arrested: Criminalizing Photography

Brian and Jeremy Hughes discuss the report: 

© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News -  Brian Hughes of Seattle, left, and his brother Jeremy Hughes of Bellingham discuss the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report on Thursday evening Jan. 30, 2014, at Anacortes High School in Anacortes, Wash.. The report concerns the safety failures at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes which exploded and killed 7 people on April 2, 2010.
The reporter was pretty friendly. Vicki was nice to work with and she knew her stuff when it comes to Tesoro. Strong communication skills go a long way to help reporters, visual and word, work to get the necessary information to the public.
I left a few hours earlier than I needed for several reasons:

  • To meet Vicki and discuss an action plan
  • To scope out and shoot some refinery shots for the deadline
  • To understand what was going to happen at the meeting, get names of the presenters, and get photos of the audience as they wait for the presentation to begin.

After spending about an hour shooting the refinery, I called Vicki and met her to go to the High School. Being as she was from San Antonio, I offered to pick her up and take her.

For an hour before the presentation I photographed people as they came in, sat together discussing the reports, and attempted to find any of the relatives of the victims. During this time I met brothers Brian and Jeremy Hughes. They are engineers who live in Seattle and were curious about what the CSB would show. (Read the full report here: CSB Release Report of Fatal Tesoro Refinery Explosion)

Unfortunately, I did not find any relatives of the victims before the presentation began. So, I shot an overall of the auditorium, the CSB presenters, and the closeups of the observers. Not very strong stuff, but you shoot what you can.

Ken Powell getting  hugged by Marie Howling Wolf
© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - Ken Powell  of  Mount Vernon, Wash.,  is hugged by Marie Howling Wolf (cq) during the public hearing and official release of the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report on Thursday evening Jan. 30, 2014, at Anacortes High School in Anacortes, Wash.  Powell's daughter Katheryn Powell, 28, of Burlington, is one of seven workers killed in an explosion at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes in the early hours of April 2, 2010.

An hour after the presentation began, I needed to download my cards, make an edit, and upload to a Dropbox folder for Luis to use for the paper. In half an hour I had uploaded 6 images for them to use: 2 of the refinery, and 4 of the meeting.

While uploading, the presentation ended and then began public commentary with questions from the audience. I shot a few of these and as I did, noticed a few older people in the audience. As they began speaking, the introduced themselves. Some of the participants are locals interested in the safety of the community, and several others family members.

Herschel Janz listens to the Presentation. His son Lew died in the accident.
© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - Hershel Janz of Anacortes, Wash., listens to Estus Ken Powell during the comments section of  a public hearing and official release of the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report on Thursday evening Jan. 30, 2014, at Anacortes High School in Anacortes. Janz's son Lew Janz and Powell's daugher Katheryn are two of seven Tesoro refinery workers killed in an early morning explosion at the Anacortes refinery on April 2, 2010.

As I was photographing one man, Herschel Janz just watched the commenters. Another older gentleman came up to the microphone and he introduced himself as Ken Powell. His daughter Katheryn Powell, 28, died from burns she received in the blast. After he finished, he stopped and shook hands with Herschel. Ken received a standing ovation as he returned to his seat.

Late afternoon Sun lights the steam as a tanker rests at dock:
© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - A ship is docked at the Tesoro Anacortes refinery in Anacortes, Wash., as seen on Friday afternoon Jan. 31, 2014. A public hearing was held during official release on Thursday evening of the U.S Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation report citing safety failures at the Tesoro Refinery in Anacortes which exploded and killed 7 people on April 2, 2010.

As I shot this, it occurred to me to call Luis and let him know of the images I was getting. It was past deadline, but in cases like this, it is always good to let the editor know if you are getting anything good and that you will be uploading them soon. Editors know that in these situations, you can sometimes get something good after deadline they will use.

Then next came Tesoro refinery worker Marie Howling Wolf. She was a good friend of Katheryn and knew Ken really well. After she spoke at the microphone concerned of the safety of her coworkers. She hugged Ken afterwards in a poignant moment.

After the filing the extra photos and story for deadline, I talked with Vicki to find out what we needed to cover and what time to meet her. She said the editors had changed the story to cover the safety record of the refinery and not local reaction. Basically, my job would be to drive around getting refinery photos.

The next day, the first thing I did was actually drive to the gate at the refinery, introduce myself, and let them know what I was doing. I was actually surprised when the Chief of Security told me that it was OK and to stay on the main road encircling the refinery. I was free to photograph any part of the refinery as long as it was visible from the road. That must made my job super easy.

Steam Rises from the main Stack:
© Paul Conrad/San Antonio Express-News - The Tesoro Anacortes refinery in Anacortes, Wash.

I spend most of the afternoon shooting the refinery from various angles from the road. While doing so, I discovered a walkway that goes from Fidalgo Bay Road, across Fidalgo Bay, and to the main road around the refinery. So I walked the Tommy Thompson Trail over the water shooting various angles.

As it began nearing sunset, I found myself looking east towards Mount Baker. The clouds still obscured the dormant volcano so a shot of the refinery with the mountain in the background would have to wait for another day. I still needed something with the huge oil tankers docked near the refinery. So looking at Google maps on my phone, I found a few spots to go check out.

One of them required a ferry ride to Guemes Island and drive along South Shore Road to find that angle. Lucky for me, the clouds parted in the west and let the Sun shine over the refinery. Got a few shots using my 80-200 and teleconverter.

Then the skies opened east as I was on the ferry ride back to Anacortes. The setting Sun lit everything in a beautiful orange as it dipped below the horizon. I drove back to Fidalgo Bay Resort to shoot a composition of the refinery against Mount Baker. The Sun had set but the alpenglow was phenomenal.

I parked my car and ran quickly to the shore with my gear. While running, I began extending the legs on my Manfrotto 055XProB tripod and placing the tripod mount on my Nikkor 80-200 f/2.8. I had to work fast as alpenglow can fade rather fast.

As I began shooting, the lights of the refinery began to turn on. I wanted the starburst-effect I know my lens can produce with the aperture stopped down to f/16 or f/22. So I based my exposure on these settings. I was getting 2, 4, and 8 second shutter times. Not only that, the alpenglow was becoming strong so I was getting both.

And in about 15 minutes, it was all gone. Taking a breather, I went through the images on my camera and found a few I liked. As I’ve had issues before of accidentally deleting them, I locked those images. One had a particularly nice twist in the steam coming from the main stack.

Alpenglow on Mount Baker as the Refinery Lights turn on
© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Mount Baker is illuminated by the setting Sun as the lights at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes, Wash., turn begin to illuminate the petroleum plant.

You can view some of the images on the San Antonio website: Tesoro Taken to Task for 2010 Explosion that Killed 7

Overall, it was nice to complete an assignment and to get a compliment from an editor I have never worked for.

If you have any work that needs covered in the Pacific Northwest, feel free to contact me here: Contact Form

Thank you for stopping by to read and view my work. Feel free to comment, critique, or just ask questions.

Also, feel free to share and reblog, link to, and add your site in the comment section.

Paul “pablo” Conrad

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To Catch a Thief: Discovering Your Photo Has Been Stolen

UPDATE: After removing the photo from the site, the owner wrote an apology. I responded and she responded in kind. No harm, no foul.

There’s nothing like the feeling of having your image stolen. First you’re flattered, then you get angry, and then you get nasty.

This was the case last night.

Bears Rule! is one of my most famous, and lucrative images. It was not licensed or commissioned for use on other websites.

In an early post, I ranted about this very image being copied and sold at an Aspen, Colo., print shop without my permission.

In the post “Do Unto Other What You Want Done Unto You,” I went through the steps required to stop the shop from selling copies of this bear photo.

It was tedious and time consuming, yet necessary. It wasn’t his image to sell.

He bought a print and then photocopied it. Here is a lesson. When you buy a print, you are not purchasing the image, but the time and materials it takes to place the image on the paper or medium.

It is not your image and unauthorized use is breaking the law.

Simply put, I believe copyright infraction is nothing but theft. The perpetrator did not ask for permission to use it.

It’s equivalent to you going over to your neighbor’s house and “borrowing” the lawnmower with no intention of returning it. You think it’s OK as your neighbor is not home for the winter and, therefore, won’t notice until they get back in the spring.

Taking a photo off a website is the same thing. You’re taking something that’s not yours without telling the owner, and when the owner catches you, you return it and apologize.

The fact remains: you took it with out permission. COPYRIGHT INFRACTION IS STILL THEFT.

Copyright is the one true value a photograph has and you must maintain control of it or lose it forever. You must protect your copyright.

While working on my Foto del Dia blog entry, I happened across a cool site.

Somehow I bumped into the website TinEye. It’s a reverse image search tool. It’s simple and easy to use. There are two ways to activate a search:

The website owner who poached my image has been contacted and the blog entry deleted.

1. Enter the URL of an image and it will find where that image is being used. Warning, this only works if there is only ONE image on the page. If there are multiple images, it uses the first. It’s a bit ineffective if you’re wanting to do a search on another image.

2. Upload a low-res image and it will search where that one is being used. This is more effective as it uses just that image. But, I beleive there are limitations on this.

Take for instance this photo of the bear. If you crop out just the mama bear standing and attempt to use that, it won’t find the other images which also contain the cub in the tree.

Therein lies both the beauty and the bane of the technology era. It’s not only easy to show your work to millions, but also it’s easier to have your work stolen. And as technology grows,

it’s easy to find who the thief is.

So for fun, I used one of my more famous bear images: Bears Rule!

Didn’t expect to see much, but I did find several blogs that were using it without attribution or permission.

One was a description of a bear outside their house and how they couldn’t get to their car. What’s funny is the description of the bear and then it states: “The worst part of the event was that the camera was still in the car. So I’ll post a black bear picture swiped from the World Wide Waste-of-time …”

Here’s a screen capture of of the blog:

So they not only use my photo without permission, but also blatantly state the “swiped” it from the web.

I immediately wrote a letter to the blog owner. Simply stated, I was flattered and outraged at the same time. It is copyright infraction to use a photo without permission.

I gave them two options and I expected them to follow neither.

The comment I posted on the blog. The blog entry was soon deleted.

1. Pay my standard website usage fee of $500.00  or

2. Face a copyright infraction lawsuit that may cost thousands.

I also tweeted the incident which was reposted on Facebook.

Not only did I leave a comment, I also subscribed to the blog.

All not to vain. This morning, the entry was deleted and the owner wrote a letter of apology. That’s all good.

The webiste owner removed the blog entry and wrote an apology.

I’m sure the blog owner was shocked. Imaging getting a letter such as that.

This was only a private blog, so there is no sense of accomplishment.

If this were a corporate entity, the battle lines would’ve been drawn and it would’ve gotten much further and much more nasty.

thank you for your time

Paul Conrad

Pablo Conrad Photography

Foto del Dia- 10/365 Using Subtleties to Choose the Photo

While editing today’s Foto del Dia, it turned out to be a lesson in editing. Looking over the finer points of each photo will help you choose one over the other. However, it can be tough sometimes.

Shopping for fruits & veggies at Pike Place Market in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Before going to last night’s Seattle SMUG Meet-Up, I stopped by Pike Place Market for some chocolate spaghetti. I took my cameras along in case I saw something to shoot.

As was the usual case, I did. A woman shopping for fruits and vegetables caught my eye. The way she interacted with the sellers was nice, as was all the neon behind her. It seemed to flow together.

I tried some up close shots with a wide, but the image was too cluttered with unnecessary elements. Moving further back and using a telephoto really cleaned it up. But, I was too short. People were getting in my way making it tough to see her.

Zooming in, I noticed the subtleties of each photo. Photo 2 was my choice.

The owner of the food stand I was standing next to was nice and lent me a milk crate on which to stand. even though it was only a foot or so higher, it really helped. I was able to keep the people in front block my view.

So I composed the photo while paying extra attention to the edges of the frame. One thing I liked was the sign in the upper left that said “Food.”

As my main subject was the woman shopping, most of my concentration was on her. I watched as she picked and chose what she wanted. Interesting gestures. Then another woman came up and was watching her as well.

The situation lasted several moments and then both left. It was fun to watch the progression. Fun to watch the interaction between her and the fruit vendors.

So onto my SmugMug Meet-up at the Seattle Center. As I had some time, I downloaded the images and began editing. I cam across these two images. The composition is almost identical, but there are subtle differences in the two women.

Do I choose the one where her arm is more fully extended? or the one where you can see more of the face of the woman in the lower left? Then zooming in, I chose the final image (Photo 2).

With her arm more extended, her hand is in front of a dark background. Also, her expression is better. She looks more decisive. More adamant about what she wants.

The fact of the word “food” not being fully visible is a minor issue to me. The expression is what I wanted in the photo and I believe is most important.

Sometimes you have to choose minor details over others.

Thanks for stopping by.