Lighting

Sneak Peak: Ellen and Sandy Dance on Their Wedding Day

On Saturday July 25th, just a month past the U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized gay marriage throughout the country, I had the pleasure of capturing true love. Sand and Ellen were married after knowing each other for over 30 years. It was a small intimate wedding and informal wedding. But beautiful none-the-less.

Pure Love:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Ellen and Sandy sing to each other as they dance during their reception at their home in Sedro-Woolley, Wash.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – Ellen and Sandy sing to each other as they dance during their reception at their home.

The light was beautiful during the ceremony and as it became later in the evening, the videographer, Michael Dyrland of Dyrland Productions, lit the area with two bright video lights. I stayed in front and to the side as I captured the guests dancing. But soon, I decided to go to the back as I liked the effects of the video lighting: they created a nice rim and back lighting effect.

It added drama without being overbearing. Plus as people danced, their faces were being lit by the lights. As I moved to the back to shoot towards the lights, Sandy and Ellen began to dance to a slow song. While they were dancing, I noticed how the video lights lit their faces, created rim lighting on their matching hats, and how bright sky filled in the shadows.

But, the moment lasted only 6 frames. As Sandy reached up and cupped Ellen’s face in her hands while singing, I was able to fire off a few frames before a guest came up and began dancing between them. The moment was gone.

I wish it was a touch more symmetrical, but I’ll take this photo.

As I downloaded the images, this frame stuck to my mind like spaghetti on a wall. I knew it was good, but I needed to know if it was truly sharp.

They couple wanted to talk to me due to my “photojournalistic eye and style” they said during the interview. I’m pretty certain they were interviewing me, not vise-verse. Within a few minutes of meeting with them, we forgot about photography and began telling stories of our lives. A 15 minute meeting turned into an hour or so of laughing. It was a great time.

For more of my wedding work, visit my gallery Wedding Portfolio of Bellingham Seattle Photographer Paul Conrad.

To book your wedding in the Bellingham, Wash., area, send me a message using my Contact Form | Paul Conrad Photography.

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Paul “pablo” Conrad

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Paul Conrad is an award-winning, nationally and internationally published freelance editorial photographer living in Bellingham north of Seattle, WA, in the Pacific Northwest. His work has been published in newspapers and magazine throughout the United States and in Europe. He is available for assignments anywhere in the Pacific Northwest.

His clients include Getty Images, Wire Image, AirBnB, The Bellingham Herald, and many local business in Whatcom County. Previous clients are Associated Press, the New York Times, L.A. Times, Denver Post, Rocky Mountain News, and many others.

His specialty is photojournalism covering news, sports, and editorial portraits, he also is skilled in family portraiture, high school senior portraits, and weddings.

Using simple #Lighting for a #Baseball #Portrait

On Sunday I had an assignment to shoot 3 team members of the Ferndale U11 Cal Ripkin All-Stars.

As part of the assignment for The Bellingham Herald, I was to meet three standouts and photograph them at practice. To be safe, I met the three early for a quick portrait session.

Always thinking on a larger scale, I kept picturing 3 major leaguers and wanted to light them as if I was working at Sports Illustrated. Hey why not think big. They may be 11, but why let that limit how you shoot it.

Using my set Nikon SB-910 speedlights and Phottix Odin TTL flash trigger and remotes, I set up a simple “studio” at home plate.

Three All-Stars:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald - Evan Rehrberger, Ethan Brooks, and Greg Roberts of the Ferndale 11-U Cal Ripkin All-Star team.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald – Evan Rehrberger, Ethan Brooks, and Greg Roberts of the Ferndale 11-U Cal Ripkin All-Star team.

As a safety, I asked one of the dads to be a test subject so I can get the light placed correctly and power output set properly. I like my strobes at a 1:2 ratio.

The main light I place on the right at about 90 degrees from the camera-subject line. The secondary fill light, at a 45 degree angle on the left. I switched the main from left to right while keeping the 1:2 ratio. This gave me lighting choices to keep me from second guessing myself during the editing process.

With the sky dark from clouds, I tried to set my exposure to underexpose the ambient light by one stop.  But in retrospect, I should have underexposed the ambient by 2 stops. Live and learn I guess.

For the three youths in one shot, I kept the lights simple: placed each strobe at a 45° angle and evenly lit.

One Shot:

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald -(l to r) Evan Rehrberger, Greg Roberts, and Ethan Brooks,  of the Ferndale 11U All-Star baseball team during practice at Pioneer Park on Sunday afternoon July 6, 2014,  in Ferndale, Wash.. Catcher Greg Roberts, first baseman Ethan Brooks, and second baseman Evan Rehberger featured.

© Paul Conrad/The Bellingham Herald -(l to r) Second baseman Evan Rehrberger, catcher Greg Roberts, and first baseman Ethan Brooks, of the Ferndale 11U All-Star baseball team during practice at Pioneer Park on Sunday afternoon July 6, 2014, in Ferndale, Wash.

  • 2 SB-910 Speedlights placed about 5 feet from subject(s). IMPORTANT!!! Set the mode for the strobes to manual.
  • Phottix Odin TTL triggers used to control light output. They give you the ability to control the light output from the camera.
  • Have subject turn to their left towards the main light to give dimension to the face.
  • Adjust lighting as needed using transmitter.
  • Swap the lights between subjects for variety. Place the left at 90° and the right at 45° for variety.
  • I did not use a tripod to be more fluidlic. But my camera position was in a general area about 5 to 7 feet from the subject.
  • For the 3 Subject photo, I placed each light at 45 degrees and set to full.

Here’s a couple of tips, which I went over in a previous blog Intro To Creative Flash: Balancing Your Flash with Ambient Light

  • Because the flash duration is so short (1/100th of a second or shorter), the aperture controls the amount of light when your flash is set on manual. Keep in mind this only works on manual. If you have your flash on auto , TTL, program, or whatever, this won’t work and you’ll get more confused. It must be on manual mode.
  • The shutter control the ambient light for the most part. Use the FP mode on your strobe if you need to go higher than the camera’s highest flash synch speed.

Simply: aperture for your flash, shutter speed for the ambient. It takes some practice, but it’s well worth it and gives you more tools for your photographic toolbox.

Simple lighting Set-up:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Using just two strobes with diffusers place about 5 feet from subjects. Radio remotes to trigger. Simple and easy.

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography – Using just two strobes with diffusers place about 5 feet from subjects. Radio remotes to trigger. Simple and easy.

Practice! Practice! Practice!!!

Photography is NOT a Spectator Sport!!

Thank you for stopping by to read and view my work. Feel free to comment, critique, or just ask questions.

Also, feel free to share and reblog, link to, and add your site in the comment section.

Paul “pablo” Conrad

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