© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Shooting the alpenglow on Mt. Shucksan while waiting for the rise of the super perigee Moon on Saturday evening June 22, 2013. As I liked the reflection better, I turned the center post of the tripod upside down to get my camera closer. Unfortunately, I inadvertently hit the focus ring and knocked it out of focus.

Tape: A Small, Yet Useful Tool


Think about this: What minor tool do you use regulary, that if you forgot, it would impact your image taking?

It was a beautiful clear evening and the super perigee Moon was coming up on Saturday June 22, 2013. Checking a few of my favorite shooting spots, The Photographer’s Ephemeris said the Moon should be rising above Mt. Shuksan in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. So, I loaded up my gear into the car, kissed my wife on the forehead, and drove to Picture Lake at the Mount Baker Ski Area.

Setting Up:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Shooting the alpenglow on Mt. Shucksan while waiting for the rise of the super perigee Moon on Saturday evening June 22, 2013. As I liked the reflection better, I turned the center post of the tripod upside down to get my camera closer. Unfortunately, I inadvertently hit the focus ring and knocked it out of focus.

But the one simple tool I forgot: A small roll of gaffer’s tape. I usually keep a roll in my camera bag, but earlier I had taken it out to tape up a backdrop to some poles. It last forever. I bought my trio of black, white, and gray, from Glazer’s Camera for about $12

For some reason, I took it out of my camera bag the day before and forgot to put it back in. I did not realize I forgot it until I arrived at my destination and began setting up for the shoot.

What I usually do is simple. After setting my camera up, I focus the lens, turn off the autofocus, and tape the focus ring. However, without tape, this was a futile effort.

Taping the Lens:

A small piece of Gaffer's Tape would've prevented a costly mishap

As Picture Lake was still frozen from the winter, I set my camera up on my tripod nearest I could to a melted portion of the lake. After spending about 15 or 20 minutes shooting, I wanted to get my camera lower to the water to get more of Mt. Shuksan reflected in the melted portion of the lake.

So I took the tripod and flipped the center pole. Then I put the tripod back where it was and adjusted the composition. I used video mode to do this. However, I unknowingly bumped the focus ring and for the next 20 frames, the mountain was out and the freezing water was in focus.

Upside Down:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - Shooting the alpenglow on Mt. Shuksan while waiting for the rise of the super perigee Moon on Saturday evening June 22, 2013. As I liked the reflection better, I turned the center post of the tripod upside down to get my camera closer. Unfortunately, I inadvertently hit the focus ring and knocked it out of focus.

After taking a few shots, I checked the images. They looked good and the composition was better as you can see more of the mountain in the water. However, I did not zoom in to check the focus. Always zoom in to check the focus of your photos. It never hurts.

As the Moon began to rise over the ridge on the right side of the mountain, I continued taking photographs.

Out of Focus

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography - The super perigee Moon rises over Mt. Shuksan in Whatcom County East of Bellingham, Wash., on Saturday evening June 22, 2013.This out of focus shot could have been prevented with a 10 cent piece of tape.

After the Moon was fully over the ridge, I pulled the rig out of the water and began checking the images. It was not until then that I noticed the images were not in focus. Not a lot I can do but continue to shoot.

But, I was able to salvage one frame from this: The alpenglow on Mount Shuksan before the super perigee Moon rose over the ridge.

The One Salvaged Image:

© Paul Conrad/Pablo Conrad Photography -  Mount Shuksan is reflected in a thawing Picture Lake as it is lit by the setting Sun on Saturday June, 22, 2013, while the super perigee Moon begins its ascent into the sky.

After getting home, I downloaded and was hoping the images were not as bad as I thought. The were.

One simple piece of tape most likely would’ve prevented the mishap. But, I got one good shot at least.

So back to the original question: What one little thing do you use on a regular basis that if you forgot, it would impact your photography?

Thank you for stopping by to read and view my work. Feel free to comment, critique, or just ask questions.

Paul “pablo” Conrad

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5 comments

    1. Good question: Neither!

      I used the “Graduated Filter” in Adobe Camera Raw and a few other adjustments. Then when I brought it into Photoshop, burned down the shadow area of the mountain, dodge the highlight are of the reflection.

      Then I used Curves in a new layer (so I can adjust it if needed at a later time without losing image data) to add mid tone contrast. I then used the “color balance” tool in another separate layer to take out some of the blue in the shadow for a little more natural look.

      Other than that, pretty much straight from the camera. All the other shots with the exception of the out of focus one are from my cell phone.

      Like

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