Hurricane Katrina – 10 Years Later – Part 3

As we drove into Pearlington, Miss., some semblance of civilization was visible. The roads were mostly clear, some homes had been torn down to their foundations, but mostly, there was still homes untouched since Hurricane Katrina decimated the town. We were shocked to find very little has changed..

Six months after Hurricane Katrina roared through, Aspen Times reporter and I returned to see what the continuing needs were for the town.

B&W Grocery –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - B & W Grocery in Pearlington, Mis., continues to lie in ruins six months after Hurricane Katrina decimated the town.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – B & W Grocery in Pearlington, Mis., continues to lie in ruins six months after Hurricane Katrina decimated the town.

Some basics services such as electricity have been restored, when we were there, a phone company was fixing the phone lines, cell phone service was restored, and most of the streets were cleared, but piles of debris still lined the roads and many homes were still in shambles.

There was still a lot of work to do. On a scale of 1 to 10, Pearlington was still a 1.

Read Scott’s “Reporter’s Blog” about our first impressions on our second trip: “Still a one on a scale 1 to 10.”

Janitor as the Postman –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - With the town's main post office destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, Bay St. Louis, Miss., postal worker Clinton Smith delivers the mail to a temporary location in Pearlington, Miss., Wednesday afternoon March 1, 2006. "I'm just a custodian," he says, "but I have to deliver the mail when nobody else wants to."

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – With the town’s main post office destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, Bay St. Louis, Miss., postal worker Clinton Smith delivers the mail to a temporary location in Pearlington, Miss., Wednesday afternoon March 1, 2006. “I’m just a custodian,” he says, “but I have to deliver the mail when nobody else wants to.”

As with the first trip, our first stop was along the main highway to see some of the people we talked with before. While driving through town, it was apparent little progress was made other than the clearing of the streets and very few homes. Many in Pearlington were still waiting for decisions from the insurance companies.

Power of the Surge –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - A riverboat remains where the storm surge from Hurricane Katrina left it along the Pearl River on March 4, 2006. The riverboat destroyed the home when the high winds and storm surge broke it from its mooring over a mile down river.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – A riverboat remains where the storm surge from Hurricane Katrina left it along the Pearl River on March 4, 2006. The riverboat destroyed the home when the high winds and storm surge broke it from its mooring over a mile down river.

There was a permanent smell to the air akin to mold and mildew. It was apparent why. The heat and humidity accentuated the rot of the lumber and debris along the roads and at homesites still untouched since August 29th, 2005, six months earlier.

Flattened –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - A home in south Pearlington, Miss., remains in ruins on March 4, 2006, six months after Hurricane Katrina decimated the town.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – A home in south Pearlington, Miss., remains in ruins on March 4, 2006, six months after Hurricane Katrina decimated the town.

During the week, we were in then out of Pearlington, went to Pass Christian, Waveland, and Bay St. Louis. Again, visiting the places we say in Sept. of 2005.

Hancock Bank –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - The gutted remains of Hancock Bank along South Beach Boulevard in Bay St. Louis, Miss.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – The gutted remains of Hancock Bank along South Beach Boulevard in Bay St. Louis, Miss.

In Bay St. Louis and Pass Christian, many homes along the waterfront were still untouched. Many buildings remained in shambles or piles. The roads were wreck due to the ground swelling from the storm surge

Antebellum Home –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Along the waterfront in Pass Christian, Miss., in March of 2006, six month after Hurricane Katrina.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Along the waterfront in Pass Christian, Miss., in March of 2006, six month after Hurricane Katrina.

Some residents did not wait for FEMA nor the insurance companies to begin the process of rebuilding. Larry Nicosia’s home on Riverfront was wiped out. The only thing left of his were the pilings the home rested on.

Rebuilding Begins –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Larry Nicosia of Pearlington, Miss., installs a floor joist atop new pillars on his Riverside Drive home site Thursday afternoon March 2, 2006. Nicosia said he left for Tallahassee, Fla., when the hurricane reached Category 5. Nicosia said he was rebuilding his home 4 1/2 feet taller than pre-Katrina. He said after the hurricane came ashore he was curious how his home faired. "I looked on the internet to find a way back," he said, "when I came across the Green Bridge, I saw my sofa stuck it it. I knew right there we were in trouble. In a way it was good the hurricane wiped (my home) out completely, it was easier to clean up."

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Larry Nicosia of Pearlington, Miss., installs a floor joist atop new pillars on his Riverside Drive home site Thursday afternoon March 2, 2006. Nicosia said he left for Tallahassee, Fla., when the hurricane reached Category 5. Nicosia said he was rebuilding his home 4 1/2 feet taller than pre-Katrina. He said after the hurricane came ashore he was curious how his home faired. “I looked on the internet to find a way back,” he said, “when I came across the Green Bridge, I saw my sofa stuck it it. I knew right there we were in trouble. In a way it was good the hurricane wiped (my home) out completely, it was easier to clean up.”

Many of the residents still relied on the recovery center for their basic supplies. Food, clothing, shelter, were all available to the residents. Charles B. Murphy had been transformed into a fully working center over the past few months.

Clothes Shopping –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - With her 3-year-old daughter Kaitlin Shelton watching with great interest, Katrina Hart of Pearlington, Miss., checks out clothing at the "Pearl*Mart" at the Charles B. Murphy Elementary School relief center Wednesday afternoon March 1, 2006. "We come about once a month to get things we need," she said.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – With her 3-year-old daughter Kaitlin Shelton watching with great interest, Katrina Hart of Pearlington, Miss., checks out clothing at the “Pearl*Mart” at the Charles B. Murphy Elementary School relief center Wednesday afternoon March 1, 2006. “We come about once a month to get things we need,” she said.

Where Children Once Laughed –

During one afternoon, we filed our photos and stories early. So Scott and I took a break at the Recovery Center. I took that time to wander about and see what I could find in the school. It was apparent someone tried cleaning.

One wing of the school showed the progress of cleaning in a weird way:

  1. The first room was cleaned except for the buckled floor
  2. The second room was mostly cleaned with trash left on the floor
  3. The third room, the desks and furniture was piled in a corner and trash on the floor, the walls were cleaned.
  4. The fourth room had the walls cleaned, but nothing else
  5. The fifth room was untouched as were the rest of the rooms in the wing.

I continued to walk through and found some incredible things. One of my favorite photos is a computer mouse surrounded by dried and cracked mud. Toys in a kindergarten room, watermarks on the wall showing the level of the storm surge.

Muddy Mouse –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Muddy Mouse: Cracked mud surrounds a child's mouse in a classroom of Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Muddy Mouse: Cracked mud surrounds a child’s mouse in a classroom of Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

Water Lines –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - The storm surge from Hurricane Katrina nearly reached the ceiling as evidenced by the water marks in a classroom of Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – The storm surge from Hurricane Katrina nearly reached the ceiling as evidenced by the water marks in a classroom of Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

Today’s Lesson Plan –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Today's Lesson: A lesson plan for Friday August 26, 2005 remains on a dry-erase board in a classroom of Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Today’s Lesson: A lesson plan for Friday August 26, 2005 remains on a dry-erase board in a classroom of Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

Teddy Bears and Toys –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Dolls: The floor of a kindergarten room is littered with dolls and stuffed toys at Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Dolls: The floor of a kindergarten room is littered with dolls and stuffed toys at Charles B. Murphy Elementary school in Pearlington, Miss., during a self-tour on March 5, 2006. I spent about 4 hours walking around the school to see the damage Hurricane Katrina did. I found some incredible stuff.

Faith continues to be a big part of the rebuilding process for many. Church services in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church were now being held in the rebuilt community center. It was was being debated whether or not to rebuild the church building.

Ash Wednesday –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Pearlington, Miss., resident Bubby Lichtenstein gets an ashen cross placed on his forhead by Father Jim O'Bryan during Sunday morning mass at St. Joseph's Church in Pearlington March 5, 2006. Six months after Hurricane Katrina, the church's community building has been cleaned, is under going repairs, and is being used for services.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Pearlington, Miss., resident Bubby Lichtenstein gets an ashen cross placed on his forhead by Father Jim O’Bryan during Sunday morning mass at St. Joseph’s Church in Pearlington March 5, 2006. Six months after Hurricane Katrina, the church’s community building has been cleaned, is under going repairs, and is being used for services.

For more images from the second trip to Pearlington, visit my gallery Hurricane Katrina -Pearlington, Miss., March 2006

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Paul “pablo” Conrad

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Paul Conrad is an award-winning, nationally and internationally published freelance editorial photographer living in Bellingham north of Seattle, WA, in the Pacific Northwest. His work has been published in newspapers and magazine throughout the United States and in Europe. He is available for assignments anywhere in the Pacific Northwest.

His clients include Getty Images, Wire Image, AirBnB, The Bellingham Herald, and many local business in Whatcom County. Previous clients are Associated Press, the New York Times, L.A. Times, Denver Post, Rocky Mountain News, and many others.

His specialty is photojournalism covering news, sports, and editorial portraits, he also is skilled in family portraiture, high school senior portraits, and weddings.

Hurricane Katrina – 10 Years Later – Part 2

Nothing would’ve prepared us for what we saw. The damage was so incredible Scott asked “With this much devastation, how do you even know where to start.” It was, in a word, a wasteland.

In late September 2005, Aspen Times reporter Scott Condon and I traveled to Pearlington, Miss., to document the struggles the town needed to overcome. The valley our newspaper covered adopted Pearlington to help in its recovery. All donations and relief efforts were focused on this one little town. Why did we go to Pearlington? Here’s an editorial from 2005 stating why: Why We Visited Pearlington

We caught a red-eye flight from Denver International Airport to the closes available commercial airport: Pensacola. From there got a rental car, stopped by a few stores for supplies such as water, food, snacks, power converters (12 vdc to 110vac) so we can charge our laptops, extra AA and AAA batteries, and other stuff. We wanted to be prepared as we were going into a disaster zone. We didn’t want to take chances.

Scott Napping at DIA –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Aspen Times reporter Scott Condon takes a nap at Denver International Airport prior to catching a red-eye flight to Pensacola, Fla.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Aspen Times reporter Scott Condon takes a nap at Denver International Airport prior to catching a red-eye flight to Pensacola, Fla.

Before leaving Aspen, I contacted a few local papers. One was the Sun-Herald in Biloxi. They had a conference room set up so visiting journalists and photographers could file on deadline. More than half the staff lost their homes in Katrina, yet they still continued to work 60, 70, or more hours per week to put the news out. They won a Pulitzer Prize in 2006  in Public Service for their continuing coverage of Hurricane Katrina. The New Orleans Times-Picayune also won for Public Service as well as one for Breaking News for their coverage of Katrina.

So we had a place to file our stories and photos. It is an hour east of Pearlington, but not a big deal. Now we needed a place to stay. Since we figured our chances of getting a hotel room were slim to none, we did bring our tents.

Nothing Left –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - A headless Virgin Mary sits atop the steps of what led to St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Pearlington, Miss.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – A headless Virgin Mary sits atop the steps of what led to St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Pearlington, Miss. During the storm surge from Hurricane Katrina, the church lifted off the foundation and eventually stopped 100 yards or so down the main road. Rescue crews destroyed it trying to clear a path into town.

While driving from Pensacola to Pearlington along Interstate 10, I noticed something interesting. The billboards along the interstate in Pensacola had mild damage. A few rips in the paper. As we progressed west, the billboards went from a few shards of paper torn, to the adverts stripped off, to the metal frames completely bent over.

When we arrived in Pearlington, we were shocked. I’ve viewed images from Katrina since it hit land a month earlier. But to see what a 20 to 30 foot storm surge could do was shocking. Whole buildings and homes flattened. Roads choked with debris. Trees snapped like toothpicks. Boats and ships sat in the woods like toys in a toy box. And at times you could smell rot.

Trying to Clean –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Pearlington, Miss., resident Tim Smith continues to clean out his home one month after Hurricane Katrina.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Pearlington, Miss., resident Tim Smith continues to clean out his home one month after Hurricane Katrina.

To survive and protect their property, some residents erected tents and lived in them while awaiting FEMA trailers. Some homes were completely abandoned. Despite circumstances, almost everyone we met was helpful, cordial, and wanted to tell their story.

Telling her story – 

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Ana Weidie of Pearlington, Miss., explains what happened to her 200 year old home after it was flooded by a nearly 30 foot storm surge from Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Ana Weidie of Pearlington, Miss., explains what happened to her 200-year-old home after it was flooded by a nearly 30 foot storm surge from Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005.

Our first mission was to contact the Pearlington Recovery Center. This is where all the donations for the Roaring Fork Valley were being sent. It also gave us a good place to set a base of operations. A place where we can interview people before heading out further into town and talk with residents.

Looking Over the Damage –

© Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Pearlington, Miss., resident George Ladner surveys the damage to his home.

© Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Pearlington, Miss., resident George Ladner surveys the damage to his home. He and his wife Margaret evacuated the area only to return and find their home completely damaged.

Once we had a few story ideas to work on, we began driving around Pearlington in search of people in their homes. We found George Ladner and his wife Margaret outside their home. They evacuated to avoid the storm. The did not expect what they found when they returned: their home was almost completely destroyed.

A Waiting Game –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Pearlington resident Margaret Ladner outside her home. Every structure and home in Pearlington, Miss., was destroyed, or heavily damaged by a 20 to 30 foot storm surge.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Pearlington resident Margaret Ladner outside her home. Every structure and home in Pearlington, Miss., was destroyed, or heavily damaged by a 20 to 30 foot storm surge.

After staying with them awhile, we found Tim Smith outside of his. He said he stayed during the storm as he rode out Hurricane Camille in 1969 and figured it wouldn’t be as bad. He regretted the decision. His wife and two kids evacuated to a shelter about 10 mile in land. His home, 5 miles from the coast, was inundated with water and high winds knocked over two huge pine trees.

Read more on The Aspen Times website here: After Riding Out Hurricane Katrina, Survivors Say Anything is Possible.

Seeing Old Friends –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Old friends greet each other with a hug at the recovery center at Charles B. Murphy Elementary School in Pearlington, Miss.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Old friends greet each other with a hug at the recovery center at Charles B. Murphy Elementary School in Pearlington, Miss.

The first day was exhausting, both physically due to the heat and mentally as I tried to come to grips with this level of devastation.  60% of Hancock County’s population of 45,000 were homeless according to Steve Sauter, Public Information Officer with FEMA. The storm surge reached 20 to 30 feet depending on what part of the county you were in.

Laundry Day –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Pearlington, Miss., resident Hillary Furey hangs laundry as children scramble around her feet.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Pearlington, Miss., resident Hillary Furey hangs laundry as children scramble around her feet.

So after spending the day in Pearlington, we headed to Biloxi to use the conference room at the Sun-Herald. The most important thing I learned during this trip was I needed to buy a laptop to handle digital files. The laptop, and old Macbook, had a slow processor and was even slower transferring the files from my card to the hard drive.

Surveying the Damage –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Frank Barber of N.J., takes a breather from volunteering to checks out the damage to U.S. 90 from Hurricane Katrina as it crosses St. Louis Bay from Bay St. Louis, Miss., October 1, 2005. He says his wife works for the state of New Jersey as a civil engineer in bridge design and that he's can't believe the damage caused by Katrina. "I'm absolutely amazed at the energy it would take to destroy this bridge," he said and added that he "can't comprehend the forces at work to cause this damage."

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Frank Barber of N.J., takes a breather from volunteering to checks out the damage to U.S. 90 from Hurricane Katrina as it crosses St. Louis Bay from Bay St. Louis, Miss., October 1, 2005. He says his wife works for the state of New Jersey as a civil engineer in bridge design and that he’s can’t believe the damage caused by Katrina. “I’m absolutely amazed at the energy it would take to destroy this bridge,” he said and added that he “can’t comprehend the forces at work to cause this damage.”

But we made deadline. And after filing, we headed to a shelter in north Hancock County. The Emergency Operations Center was established at the high school in Kiln (a town everybody kept reminding us is the home of Green Pay Packers quarterback Brett Farve.) When we arrived, the director told us they had no available cots for us. But that was OK as we were smart enough to bring our tents. And our first night was camping under the stars next to the Hancock County Airport.

Beginning Repairs –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Surveying the damage to downtown Bay St. Louis, Miss., David Wages of Columbia, Miss., pauses from working on the CSX Railroad bridge across St. Louis Bay Saturday morning October1, 2005. The Scott Bridge Company supervisor said damage from the hurricane shut down the railroad's major route across the south.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Surveying the damage to downtown Bay St. Louis, Miss., David Wages of Columbia, Miss., pauses from working on the CSX Railroad bridge across St. Louis Bay Saturday morning Oct. 1, 2005. The Scott Bridge Company supervisor said damage from the hurricane shut down the railroad’s major route across the south.

The next day we got lucky and found a gentleman who lived in Pass Christian where his house was pretty much unscathed. Joseph Runnels, who works as an attorney for the state of Mississippi, was assigned to Hancock County to field complaints of price gouging. He had no internet available, but that was no problem. It made for a good base of operations so-to-speak as we headed out from there to explore and document other areas such as Pass Christian, Bay St. Louis, Waveland, and other areas.

He’s Watching Over –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - A crucifix watches over the remains of St. Paul's Catholic Church in Pass Christian, Miss. The stained glass windows of the Apostles remained intact while the others shattered from the wind.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – A crucifix watches over the remains of St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Pass Christian, Miss. The stained glass windows of the Apostles remained intact while the others shattered from the wind.

With our housing taken care of, we felt more at ease and could concentrate on working our stories and finding new ones. In fact, one of the disturbing things we discovered was the incredible amount of clothing and supplies not reaching their designated areas. Truckers could not make it to their destination so they just found places and dumped their load. One was a tennis court not too far from the Runnels’ house.

Wasted Resources –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Piles of rotting clothes fill a tennis court along Menge Avenue in Pass Christian, Miss., on Oct. 2, 2005, one month after Hurricane Katrina. Distribution networks for relief efforts have been in disarray with many donations being thrown away or simply abandoned.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Piles of rotting clothes fill a tennis court along Menge Avenue in Pass Christian, Miss., on Oct. 2, 2005, one month after Hurricane Katrina. Distribution networks for relief efforts have been in disarray with many donations being thrown away or simply abandoned.

 

Recovery Center in Pearlington –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Helping her daughter Lea-Lah, 9, get some clothes, Ivy Watson holds up shirt to see if it will fit while shopping at the Charles Murphy Elementary distribution center in Pearlington, Miss., Friday afternoon September 30, 2005. Ivy said her home was moved off its foundation and is now on both sides of 10th street.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Helping her daughter Lea-Lah, 9, get some clothes, Ivy Watson holds up shirt to see if it will fit while shopping at the Charles Murphy Elementary distribution center in Pearlington, Miss., Friday afternoon September 30, 2005. Ivy said her home was moved off its foundation and is now on both sides of 10th street.

Praying for Help –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Ana Weidie of Pearlington, Miss., prays during Sunday morning mass at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Pearlington October 2, 2005. Weidie's 200-year-old home was heavily damaged by the storm surge when Hurricane Katrina roared ashore August 29.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Helping her daughter Lea-Lah, 9, get some clothes, Ivy Watson holds up shirt to see if it will fit while shopping at the Charles Murphy Elementary distribution center in Pearlington, Miss., Friday afternoon September 30, 2005. Ivy said her home was moved off its foundation and is now on both sides of 10th street.

Outside Church –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - In spite of all the destruction of Hurricane Katrina surrounding them, Father Jim O'Bryan of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Pearlington, Miss., gives his sermon Sunday morning October 2, 2005. St. Joseph's church lifted off its foundation and floated to the middle of the road during the storm surge from Katrina. Work crews destroyed the remainder of the church when they cleared routhe 607 of debris.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – In spite of all the destruction from Hurricane Katrina surrounding them, Father Jim O’Bryan of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Pearlington, Miss., gives his sermon Sunday morning October 2, 2005. St. Joseph’s church lifted off its foundation and floated to the middle of the road during the storm surge from Katrina. Work crews destroyed the rest of the church when they cleared Route 607 of debris.

Pass Christian Waterfront –

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times - Motels, hotels, and apartments were destroyed in Pass Christian, Miss., when Hurricane Katrina decimated the waterfront.

©Paul Conrad/The Aspen Times – Motels, hotels, and apartments were destroyed in Pass Christian, Miss., when Hurricane Katrina decimated the waterfront.

Don’t forget to sign up for email updates with tips and tricks to improve your photography.

Thank you for stopping by to read and view my work. Feel free to comment, critique, or just ask questions.

Also, feel free to share and reblog, link to, and add your site in the comment section. Sign up for updates so you don’t miss on other postings.

Paul “pablo” Conrad

Follow me on these various Social Networks:

  1. “Like” my Page on Facebook
  2. Follow me @paulconradphotography on Instagram
  3. Follow me on Twitter
  4. Follow me on Pinterest

Paul Conrad is an award-winning, nationally and internationally published freelance editorial photographer living in Bellingham north of Seattle, WA, in the Pacific Northwest. His work has been published in newspapers and magazine throughout the United States and in Europe. He is available for assignments anywhere in the Pacific Northwest.

His clients include Getty Images, Wire Image, AirBnB, The Bellingham Herald, and many local business in Whatcom County. Previous clients are Associated Press, the New York Times, L.A. Times, Denver Post, Rocky Mountain News, and many others.

His specialty is photojournalism covering news, sports, and editorial portraits, he also is skilled in family portraiture, high school senior portraits, and weddings.